Listed here are the up to date outlook maps for this winter, heading into 2022. These are from NOAA’s Local weather Prediction Middle and have been up to date in mid-December 2021 and are essentially the most present outlooks for temperatures and precipitation for the interval January via March 2022 for the USA.

Temperature Outlook: January-March 2022

Precipitation Outlook: January-March 2022

This replace continues to point out a typical La Niña sample, with colder and wetter circumstances throughout the Northwestern portion of the US and drier and hotter throughout the Southwestern United States. In-between, throughout Northern California, Utah & Colorado are predicted to have are equal probabilities (50/50) of seeing above or beneath regular temperatures and precipitation.

The maps above are the “Two-Class” experimental outlooks, that are barely completely different and rather less complicated than the older “Three-Class” outlooks. That’s, they use a scale that begins at 50% or better for above and beneath regular classes.

Three-Class Outlook from NOAA

The three-class outlooks use a extra nebulous scale that begins at 33%. These are proven beneath for comparability.

 

 

My interpretation of those maps is that the tendencies in the direction of beneath regular temperatures and above regular precipitation within the Northwestern United States will not be that robust. The likelihood percentages listed on these maps are low, indicating they’re solely “leaning in the direction of” these developments this winter. Similar is true for the Southwestern United States.

Alaska and the Southeastern a part of the nation present the strongest possibilities for colder and hotter temperatures, respectively. Northwest Montana, Northern Idaho and the higher Midwest are the one areas that even method a greater than 50% likelihood of seeing above regular precipitation. Southern New Mexico and Florida are the one areas with better than a 50% likelihood of being drier than regular the remainder of this winter.

Take that for what you could and have a Joyful New Yr!

Put up by meteorologist Jim Woodmencey on the Winter Solstice

By 24H

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